Fireproof – Saving a Marriage Movie

Fireproof (film)
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Caleb is a firefighter, and town hero, who finds it impossible to save his dying marriage to Katherine, a public relations officer at a Georgia hospital. The forty-day marital counseling project Caleb takes on doesn’t work, but it becomes a kind of tool the Almighty uses to bring renewal to the damaged couple. Long before the marriage is mended, Caleb gives himself to Christ. It makes a difference.

The comic moments in Alex and Stephen Kendrick‘s film are lame and so is much, though not all, of the acting (Kirk Cameron is solid as Caleb, Erin Bethea respectable as Katherine) . Continue reading “Fireproof – Saving a Marriage Movie”

David Zucker – An American Carol

Dean's Movie ReviewIn this David Zucker An American Carol, a Michael Moore-like filmmaker (Kevin Farley) is the story’s Scrooge who, out of deep disgust with American foreign policy, resolves to try to get the Fourth of July legally banned. Continue reading “David Zucker – An American Carol”

2 Reviews: Revolutionary Road & Taken

My bro Dean D. Gives his hip review of 2 movies. “Revolutionary Road” and “Taken”  Que em up at Netflix and see if ya agree 🙂

Revolutionary Road

Did you know American suburbanites of the 1950s were often

Taken to Revolutionary Road
Image by onkel_wart via Flickr

desperately unhappy? It’s true.

Know what else?

People today are often desperately unhappy as well, and many, many of them are secular liberals. What’s to become of them?

The frustrating Sam Mendes directed this movie. It’s even worse than his “American Beauty and “Road to Perdition.” Not only is it dated and banal and leaden, it is also written in such a way that it’s impossible to care about the characters. Pity those poor American suburbanites.

Taken

For a suspenseful action flick, Taken, which pits Liam Neeson against sex-slave traders who have kidnapped his daughter, is inferior to the TV series, “24.” This doesn’t mean it isn’t exciting or well-made, though.

It’s both. However . . .

Most of the violence the criminals receive at Neeson’s hand they absolutely deserve. On the other hand, the film glorifies a murderer.